Church of Light in the Steel Realms


Steel Realms

Lords of Light/Light Bringers

Common Practices and Customs

Family Chapels, Shrines and Temples: There is often 4 rooms to represent the 4 major figures in the familial constructs. Beyond an entry areas, the first and most prominent rooms is the primary god of the family. Then there is an “Enshrined Passage” with carvings of the pact between family and faith. There is almost always a “Mothers Hearth” – even if the patron goddess is Aerna. This is where the bones of children who died in childbirth are laid. A “Corridor of Light” represents a symbolic passage to the realms of Light and Wonder. The room dedicated to Balthazaar is always the “Room of Judgement” – somewhere is always an arch whereupon the ever watchful eyes of Balthazaar are engraved – this usually guards an amphitheater where all living family members can gather and discuss family matters. There are 4 steps in this amphitheater where the bottom platform is flanked by the Shield-Men of Whelm to symbolically protect the speaker. In the most devout of places is a “Chamber of Stars” which is a place dedicated to ‘burning away the sins’ of the faithful.

Spirit Web: The ancient light worshipers believers the spirits of their ancestors kept walking these family crypts and shrines. In some of them, an ancient practice of spirit webs can be found. These are silver wires, covered in crsytals and bolted into a a corridor. They flow to a place off to one side of a psaage. It is easy enough to dismantle or walk through, but a simple miunded spirit will follow the lattice into the “Spirit Trap” – a series of narrow corridors carved and hung with clothes, tapestries, and minor daily items of the dead in order to confuse them and keep them there. It was a superstition meant to keep ones though free and clear of past family matters. However, the Spirit Trap was a place to go to commune with past family members – to remember them, and their names etched into the walls. Candles were often placed in wall scones – each scone unique to the individual.